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Das ESC-Logo im Wandel der Zeit. Das offizielle Artwork zum Eurovision Song Contest in Rotterdam. Foto: NPO. Das Logo und Motto "Open Up" des ESC​. Eurovision Song Contest ESC Logo. ← zurück zum Artikel. Full size → Großansicht: × px · vorhergehendes Bild. Eurovision Song Contest ESC Logo. Die LOGO! der Firma Siemens Niels Riekhof. Hier kann die IP-Adresse geändert werden. Mit „OK“ editieren. Mit „Esc“ Editiermodus verlassen. Weiter mit. Eurovision Song Contest ESC Logo – vorher und nachher. ← zurück zum Artikel. Full size → Großansicht: × px · vorhergehendes Bild nächstes Bild. Datei:ESC bankra.co Es ist keine höhere Auflösung vorhanden. ESC__bankra.co ‎( × Pixel, Dateigröße: 11 KB, MIME-Typ: image/​png).

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Das Logo für den Eurovision Song Contest in Rotterdam ist da und es zelebriert gleichzeitig das jährige Jubiläum des ESC sowie das. Das ESC-Logo im Wandel der Zeit. Das offizielle Artwork zum Eurovision Song Contest in Rotterdam. Foto: NPO. Das Logo und Motto "Open Up" des ESC​. Datei:ESC bankra.co Es ist keine höhere Auflösung vorhanden. ESC__bankra.co ‎( × Pixel, Dateigröße: 11 KB, MIME-Typ: image/​png). Esc Logo

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The logo includes both the shield and the type, please keep them together. Don't modify the type or use it without the shield. When you place the print version of the logo in your software i.

This will maintain the proportions and prevent skewing, as shown below. Electronic versions of the logo have been optimized for quick download and screen colors.

Please use the electronic versions of the logo for online applications. Same holds true for print. The print versions of the logos have also been optimized for printing from inkjets, to laser, to offset.

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There are two versions of the logo - horizontal and stacked. Select from the links below to download the version that works best for you.

If it is not installed on your computer, download it for free from Adobe. Logos need personal space too. The programme is hosted by one of the participant countries, and the programme is broadcast from the auditorium in the host city.

During this programme, after all the songs have been performed, the countries then proceed to cast votes for the other countries' songs: nations are not allowed to vote for their own song.

The winner receives, simply, the prestige of having won—although it is usual for a trophy to be awarded to the winning songwriters, and the winning country is formally invited to host the event the following year.

The programme is invariably opened by one or more presenters, welcoming viewers to the show. Between the songs and the announcement of the voting, an interval act is performed.

The accompanying theme music used on other Eurovision broadcasts is the prelude to Marc-Antoine Charpentier 's Te Deum. Active members are those who are located in states that fall within the European Broadcasting Area , or are member states of the Council of Europe.

If an EBU Active Member wishes to participate they must fulfil conditions as laid down by the rules of the contest.

A separate copy is drafted annually. As of [update] , this included the necessity to have broadcast the previous year's programme within their country.

After Russia's withdrawal from the event in Ukraine, and Channel 1 Russia's refusal to air the event, there is some confusion as to whether this rule still exists.

C1R did enter a song in , which was voted out of the competition at the semi-final. A common misconception is that Eurovision participants have to be from Europe.

However, that's not true, any full EBU member is eligible for participation. The broadcaster must have paid the EBU a participation fee in advance of the deadline specified in the rules of the contest for the year in which they wish to participate.

Eligibility to participate is not determined by geographic inclusion within the continent of Europe, despite the "Euro" in "Eurovision" — nor does it have any relation to the European Union.

Several countries geographically outside the boundaries of Europe have competed: Israel , Cyprus and Armenia in Western Asia Cyprus is a member of the Council of Europe and a member state of the European Union , since , and respectively; Australia since [31] and Morocco, in North Africa, in the competition alone.

In addition, several transcontinental countries with only part of their territory in Europe have competed: Turkey, since ; Russia, since ; Georgia, since ; and Azerbaijan, which made its first appearance in the edition.

Fifty-two countries have participated at least once. Most of the expense of the contest is covered by commercial sponsors and contributions from the other participating nations.

The contest is considered to be a unique opportunity for promoting the host country as a tourist destination. In the summer of , Ukraine abolished its normal visa requirement for visitors from the EU to coincide with its hosting of the event.

Preparations for the event start a matter of weeks after the host wins in the previous year, and confirms to the EBU that they intend to—and have the capacity to—host the event.

The two largest concert venues were Parken in Copenhagen which held approximately 38, people when Denmark hosted in [18] and the Esprit Arena in Düsseldorf which held approximately 36, people when Germany hosted in The smallest town to have been hosts was Millstreet in County Cork , Ireland, in The village had a population of 1, [37] —although the Green Glens Arena venue could hold up to 8, people.

The hotel and press facilities in the vicinity are always a consideration when choosing a host city and venue. After the first two contests were hosted by Switzerland and Germany, it was decided that henceforth the winning country would host the contest the next year.

In all but five of the years since this rule has been in place, the winning country has hosted the show the following year.

The exceptions are:. With the invitation of Australia to participate since , it was announced that due to the logistical and financial issues that would occur if Australia were to host, [43] in the event of an Australian victory, the broadcaster SBS will co-host the next contest in a European city in collaboration with an EBU member broadcaster of their choice.

The original generic logo was introduced for the contest , to create a consistent visual identity. The host country's flag appears in the heart of the generic logo.

Each year of the contest, the host country creates a sub-theme which is usually accompanied and expressed with a sub-logo and slogan.

The theme and slogan are announced by the EBU and the host country's national broadcaster. The generic logo was revamped in , ten years after the first generic logo was created.

The revamped logo was conducted by lead designer Cornelis Jacobs and his team of Cityzen Agency.

Beginning with the contest, a slogan has been associated with each contest except in The slogan is decided by the host broadcaster and is then used to develop a visual design for the contest.

A slogan was also selected for the contest before its cancellation. The term "Eurovision Week" is used to refer to the week during which the Contest takes place.

In addition to rehearsals in their home countries, every participant is given the opportunity to rehearse on the stage in the Eurovision auditorium.

These rehearsals are held during the course of several days before the Saturday show, and consequently the delegations arrive in the host city many days before the event.

Journalists and fans are also present during the preceding days, and so the events of Eurovision last a lot longer than a few hours of television.

Each participating broadcaster nominates a Head of Delegation, whose job it is to co-ordinate the movements of the delegate members, and who acts as that country's representative to the EBU in the host city.

The commentators are given dedicated commentary booths situated around the back of the arena behind the audience. Since , the first rehearsals have commenced on the Sunday almost two weeks before the Grand Final.

There are two rehearsal periods for each country. The countries taking part in the semi-finals have their first rehearsal over four days from the first Sunday to Wednesday.

The second is from Thursday to Sunday. The countries which have already directly qualified for the Grand Final rehearse on the Saturday and Sunday.

After each country has rehearsed, the delegation meets with the show's production team in the viewing room.

Here, they watch the footage of the rehearsal just performed. At this point the Delegation may make known any special requirements or changes needed for the performance, and request them to the host broadcaster.

Following this meeting, the delegation hold a press conference where members of the accredited press may pose them questions. A printed summary of the questions and answers which emerge from the press conferences is produced by the host press office, and distributed to journalists' pigeon-holes.

Before each of the semi-finals three dress rehearsals are held. Two rehearsals are held the day before one in the afternoon and the other in the evening , while the third is held on the afternoon of the live event.

Since tickets to the live shows are often scarce, tickets are also sold so the public may attend these dress rehearsals. The same applies for the final, with two rehearsals on the Friday and the third on Saturday afternoon before the live transmission of the grand final on Saturday evening.

On the Monday evening of Eurovision Week, a Mayor's Reception is traditionally held, where the city administration hosts a celebration that Eurovision has come to their city.

This is usually held in a grand municipally owned location in the city centre. All delegations are invited, and the party is usually accompanied by live music, complimentary food and drink and—in recent years— fireworks.

After the semi-final and grand final there are after-show parties, held either in a facility in the venue complex or in another suitable location within the city.

A Euroclub is held every night of the week: this is a Eurovision-themed nightclub , to which all accredited personnel are invited.

During the week many delegations have traditionally hosted their own parties in addition to the officially sponsored ones.

However, in the new millennium the trend has been for the national delegations to centralise their activity and hold their celebrations in the Euroclub.

Numerous detailed rules must be observed by the participating nations, and a new version is produced each year, for instance the rules specify various deadlines, including the date by which all the participating broadcasters must submit the final recorded version of their song to the EBU.

The rules also cover sponsorship agreements and rights of broadcasters to re-transmit the show. The most notable rules which affect the format and presentation of the contest have changed over the years, and are highlighted here.

All vocals must be sung live; no voices are permitted on the backing tracks. The Croatian delegation stated that there were no human voices, but only digitally synthesised sounds which replicated vocals.

From until , the host country was required to provide a live orchestra. Before , all music had to be played by the host orchestra.

From onwards, pre-recorded, non-vocal backing tracks were permitted—although the host country was still obliged to provide a live orchestra to give participants a choice.

If a backing track was used, then all the instruments heard on the track were required to be present on the stage.

In this requirement was dropped. In the requirement for a live orchestra was removed: it was left as an optional contribution.

Since then, a live orchestra has not been used at the contest. Each submission must have vocals; purely instrumental music has never been allowed.

In the past, competitors have been required to sing in one of their own national languages, but this rule has been changed several times over the years.

From until , there was no rule restricting the languages in which the songs could be sung. In , a rule was imposed stating that the songs must be performed in one of the official languages of the country participating, after Sweden was the first country to not sing in their own language, with opera singer Ingvar Wixell performing Sweden's entry in English.

The language restriction continued until , when performers were again allowed to sing in any language they wished. In , the EBU decided to revert to the national language restriction.

However, special dispensation was given to Germany and Belgium as their national selections had already taken place before the decision was made; both countries' entries that year were in English.

In , the Dutch entry, " Amambanda ", was sung partly in English and partly in an artificial language. Since the language rule was abolished in , songs in English have become increasingly common.

In , all but three out of 36 semi-finalists had songs in English, with only two Bosnia and Herzegovina and Macedonia performing songs in their native languages, as Austria sent a song in French.

In the final, all but three out of 26 contestants had songs in English. After Salvador Sobral 's win in with a Portuguese-language song, the edition saw a significant increase in the use of native languages, with twelve of 43 participants singing in their country's native language not including Estonia, whose representative opted to sing in Italian.

The voting system used in the contest has changed over the years. The current system has been in place since , and is a positional voting system.

Each country awards two sets of 12, 10, 8—1 points to their 10 favourite songs: one from their professional jury of votes of five music professionals and the other from televoting.

Historically, a country's votes were decided by an internal jury, but in five countries Austria, Switzerland, Germany, Sweden and the United Kingdom experimented with televoting , giving members of the public in those countries the opportunity to vote en masse for their favourite songs.

The experiment was a success, [41] and from onwards all countries were encouraged to use televoting wherever possible.

Back-up juries are still used by each country, in the event of a televoting failure. Nowadays members of the public may also vote by SMS, in addition to televoting.

In every case, every country cannot vote for its own song [69] From , the public may also vote via a mobile app. The current method for ranking entries, introduced in , is to sum together the points calculated from the telephone vote and the jury separately.

Since the voting has been presided over by the EBU scrutineer , who is responsible for ensuring that all points are allocated correctly and in turn.

Since , the Executive Supervisor was supported by an Event Supervisor, to oversee and coordinate all event-related matters on behalf of the EBU.

Sietse Bakker served in the role for the first six years, replaced by Nadja Burkhardt. After the interval act is over, when all the points have been calculated, the presenter s of the show call upon each voting country in turn to invite them to announce the results of their vote.

Prior to the announcements were made over telephone lines ; with the audio being piped into the auditorium for the audience to hear, and over the television transmission.

However, since and including the announcements have been presented visually. Often the opportunity is taken by each country to show their spokesperson standing in front of a backdrop which includes a famous place in that country.

For example, the French spokesperson might be seen standing in front of the Eiffel Tower or an Italian presenter might be seen with the Colosseum in the background.

From to , some countries did not have their spokesperson in front of a backdrop of a famous place, instead opting to show the spokesperson in the studio or in a famous building, for example when Malta presented their votes from a hotel in the country in , or have them standing behind a blurred image of the famous building or skyline.

From the s, new technology meant that the spokespersons could be standing behind a live video of a famous place in that country.

There have also been occasions where the backdrop of the spokesperson is not a still image or video, but instead is a slideshow of multiple shots of many of that country's famous buildings.

From to , the participating countries were called in reverse order of the presentation of their songs, and from to , they were called in the same order in which their songs had been presented except for Since , when semi-finals were introduced, the order of the countries' announcements of votes has changed; and the countries that did not make it to the final each year could also vote.

In , the countries were called in alphabetical order according to their two-letter ISO codes. Between and , like in , a separate draw was held to determine the order in which countries would present their votes.

From to , each country sent two jurors, who were present at the contest venue though the juries in were locked away in the Great Hall of Edinburgh Castle and announced their votes as the camera was trained on them.

In one of the Swiss jurors presented his votes with flamboyant gestures. This system was retired the next year.

In no public votes were presented: a closed jury simply announced that Switzerland had won. As digital graphic technology progressed, the physical scoreboards were superseded in by an electronic representation which could be displayed on the TV screen at the will of the programme's director.

In the EBU decided to save time during the broadcast—much of which had been taken up with the announcement of every single point—because there was an ever-increasing number of countries voting.

Countries must announce the country names and points in either English or French and the scores are repeated by the contest's presenters in the other language.

For this reason, the expression douze points when the host or spokesperson states the top score in French is popularly associated with the contest throughout the continent.

In addition, only the jury points are announced by country. The televoting results are announced in aggregate, from the lowest-scoring country to the highest.

In the contest the televoting results were announced in aggregate in inverse standing order based on the jury votes; starting with Spain 7 points from the juries and culminating in Sweden points from the juries.

After the winner has been announced, the televoting points from the country where the contest is watched from are briefly seen on screen.

In , four of the sixteen countries taking part, France, Spain, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, all tied for first place with 18 points each.

There was nothing in the rules to decide an outright winner, so all four were declared joint winners. This caused much discontent among most of the other participating countries, and mass walkouts were threatened.

Finland, Norway, Sweden and Portugal did not participate in the Contest as a protest against the results of the previous year.

This prompted the EBU to introduce a tie-break rule. The current tie-break procedure was implemented in the contest.

In the procedure, sometimes known as a countback , if two or more countries tie, the song receiving more points from the televote is the winner.

If the songs received the same number of televote points, the song that received at least one televote point from the greatest number of countries is the winner.

If there is still a tie, a second tie-breaker counts the number of countries who assigned twelve televote points to each entry in the tie.

Tie-breaks continue with ten points, eight points, and so on until the tie is resolved. If the tie cannot be resolved after the number of countries which assigned one point to the song is equal, the song performed earlier in the running order is declared the winner, unless the host country performed earlier in which case the song performed later would be the winner.

The tie-break procedure originally applied only to first place ties, [22] but since has been applied to all places. As of , the only time since when two or more countries have tied for first place on total points alone was in , when France and Sweden both totalled points.

At that time, there was no televote, and the tie break was to determine which country had received the most sets of twelve points, then ten points, and so on.

Both France and Sweden had received four sets of 12 points, but Sweden had received more sets of point scores, they were declared the winners.

Had the current predominant tiebreaker been in play, France would have won instead by virtue of receiving points from more overall countries.

Each participating broadcaster is required to broadcast the show in its entirety: including all songs, recap, voting and reprise, skipping only the interval act for advertising breaks if they wish.

The Dutch state broadcaster pulled their broadcast of the final to provide emergency news coverage of a major incident, the Enschede fireworks disaster.

In , Chinese broadcaster Mango TV edited the Albanian and Irish songs out of their broadcast of the first semi-final for violations of Chinese broadcast regulations.

The Albanian performer had visible tattoos, and the Irish song featured a storyline showing vignettes of a homosexual couple. Eurovision terminated Mango's broadcasting rights when the broadcaster refused to agree to air the second semi-final and the grand final unedited.

The first edition ever of the Eurovision Song Contest in was broadcast live, but not recorded, so only a sound recording of the radio transmission has survived from the original broadcast.

In late , the EBU had begun archiving all the contests since the first edition in to be finalised before the Contest, for the 60th anniversary.

In , hosted in Paris only a month after the South Lebanon conflict , during the performance of the Israeli entry, the Jordanian broadcaster JRTV suspended the broadcast and showed pictures of flowers.

When it became apparent during the later stages of the voting sequence that Israel's song " A-Ba-Ni-Bi " was going to win the contest, JRTV abruptly ended the transmission.

In , Lebanon intended to participate in the contest. The EBU informed them that such an act would breach the rules of the contest, and Lebanon was subsequently forced to withdraw from the competition.

Their late withdrawal incurred a fine, since they had already confirmed their participation and the deadline had passed.

As of [update] , the albums were banned completely from sale. However, the song text was banned by Eurovision as it was interpreted as criticism against Prime Minister of Russia Vladimir Putin after the Russo-Georgian War the previous year.

When asked to change the lyrics of the song, the Georgian broadcaster GPB withdrew from the contest. In the contest, Dana International was sent to compete to represent Israel to perform the song "Diva".

International is a transgender woman and her victory displayed the notion that Eurovision was a place where it was safe to be openly LGBTQ.

Although most of the European public are accepting of this identity, Russian media has had negative reactions to some of the openly queer productions.

The number of countries participating has steadily grown over time, from seven in to over 20 in the late s. In , twenty-five countries participated in the competition, including, for the first time, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia and Slovenia, entering independently due to the dissolution of Yugoslavia.

Because the contest is a live television programme, a reasonable time limit must be imposed on the duration of the show.

In recent years the nominal limit has been four hours, with the broadcast occasionally over-running. Several relegation or qualification systems have been tried to limit the number of countries participating in the contest at one time.

Thus the Contest introduced two new features: first, a pre-selection competition was held in Ljubljana in which seven new countries fought for three places in the international competition.

Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Estonia, Hungary, Romania, Slovenia and Slovakia took part in Kvalifikacija za Millstreet ; and the three former Yugoslav republics, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia and Slovenia, qualified for a place in the international final.

Relegation continued in and ; [] but in a different pre-selection system was used, in which nearly all the countries participated.

Audio tapes of all the songs were sent to juries in each of the countries some weeks before the television show.

These juries selected the songs which would be included in the international broadcast. One country which failed to qualify in the pre-selection was Germany.

As one of the largest financial contributors to the EBU, their non-participation in the contest brought about a funding issue, which the EBU would have to consider.

Since , France , Germany , Spain and United Kingdom have automatically qualified for the final, regardless of their positions on the scoreboard in previous contests, as they are the four biggest financial contributors to the EBU.

On 31 December , it was announced that Italy would compete in the Eurovision Song Contest after a fourteen-year absence and that it would also automatically qualify for the final, joining the other four qualifiers to become the "Big Five".

Turkey withdrew from the Contest with the status of the "Big Five" being one of the reasons cited.

Without the contribution of The Big Five it is estimated that the participation cost for a "standard" country would be double what they currently pay.

It is sometimes discussed whether the Big 5 measure benefits or prejudicates the countries' performances in the contest. Since its creation, countries of the Big Five have placed last in 8 of the latest 15 contests , , , , , , , and The only Big 5 country that has never finished last since the introduction of this concept is Italy: since its return in , the country has been successful, and placed in the top 10 seven times out of 9 contests, including four times in the top 5, a third place and twice as the runner up; its worst place was a 21st in Some measures have been taken by the EBU to give the Big 5 contestants a similar status to those competing at the semi-finals, such as broadcasting extended snippets of their acts in the semi-final interval.

From to , countries qualified for each contest based on the average of their points totals for their entries over the previous five years.

The worst example of this was that Bosnia and Herzegovina finished 7th with 86 points in the Contest , but it wasn't enough to save the country being relegated from taking part in the Contest.

As a result, the EBU reverted to the older relegation system for the and contests. Soon, the EBU created what was hoped would be a more permanent solution to the problem.

A qualification round, known as the semi-final, was introduced for the Contest. The highest-placed songs from the semi-final qualified for the grand final, while the lower-placed songs were eliminated.

From to , the semi-final programme was held on the Thursday of Eurovision Week. The ten highest-placed non-Big Four countries in the "grand final" were guaranteed a place in the following year's grand final, without having to qualify.

If, for example, Germany came in the top ten, the eleventh-placed non-Big-Four country would automatically qualify for the next year's grand final.

At the 50th annual meeting of the EBU reference group in September , it was decided that, with still more nations entering, starting from the contest onwards two semi-finals would be held, [] from each of which one could qualify for the final.

The only countries which automatically qualify for the grand final are the host country and the Big Five: France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom, who continue to enjoy their protected status.

In each of the semi-finals the voting is conducted among those countries which participate in that semi-final. With regard to the automatic grand final qualifiers, who do not participate in the semi-finals, a draw is conducted to determine in which semi-final each of them will be allowed to vote.

In contrast, every participating country in a particular year may vote in the Saturday grand final — whether their song qualified for the final or not.

The ten countries which receive the most votes in each semi-final qualify for the grand final. They are announced by the presenters in English and French, in a random order.

Full voting results are withheld until after the grand final, whereupon they are published on the EBU's website. As of [update] , Ireland holds the record for the highest number of wins, having won the contest seven times.

Sweden is second with six wins. France , Luxembourg , the Netherlands and the United Kingdom are joint third with five wins each.

Israel holds four victories. Denmark and Norway have both won three times, six countries have won twice, while 12 countries have won once.

A further 24 countries have participated, but have yet to win. The United Kingdom holds the record for the highest number of runner-up placings, coming in second on no fewer than 15 occasions as of [update].

Germany, Russia, France, Spain and Ireland have four runner-up entries. Norway holds the record for finishing in last place in the final the most times: eleven.

Israel is the only non-European country to win four times. Most recently in with Netta Barzilai and Toy, who won with points.

Croatia is the only country to have never won the contest as its current state, but has provided a winner for a former state - Yugoslavia.

In , Yugoslavia won the contest with " Rock Me " performed by Riva , who won the Yugoslav selection competition that year representing along with 2 more acts the Yugoslav Socialist Republic of Croatia.

The contest was subsequently held in Zagreb, now the capital of Croatia. The early years of the contest saw many wins for "traditional" Eurovision countries: France, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg.

However, the success of these countries has declined in recent decades; France last won in and Luxembourg, in The Netherlands won again in Luxembourg last entered the contest in The first years of the 21st century produced numerous first-time winners, from both "new" and long-serving countries who had previously entered numerous times but without victories.

Every year from to inclusive, a country won for its first time. Estonia was the first post-Soviet country to win the competition in Latvia won for the first time in In , Turkey won for the first time.

In , Greece won for the first time, 15 years after the last Southern European country won, i. Italy in Overall the South of Europe won the competition only six times seven if Serbia is included.

The winner was Finland 's Lordi , earning Finland's first win after having entered the contest for 45 years.

Ukraine on the other hand did not have to wait so long, winning with only their second entry in Notably Conchita Wurst 's win in broke a year losing run for Austria since their win.

The contest was won by Russia in Serbia won the very first year it entered as an independent state, in , with the Serbian-language ballad " Molitva ".

When Portugal won in , they ended a year run of entering without a win, beating Finland 's previous record of 45 years.

Cyprus now leads this record, with 35 years without a win, achieving their highest score, second, in Malta is the most successful country without a win, achieving two-second places and two third places.

In , Norway won the contest with points — Alexander Rybak held the winning title with his song " Fairytale ". His performance meant he had the highest total in the history of the competition, becoming the first competitor to score or more points, including 16 maximum scores.

This feat was emulated in when Sweden won with points, with a new record of 18 maximum scores. Russia placed second with points, becoming the first country to score more than points without winning.

In the scoring system was changed, making much easier to achieve over points. The winner — Jamala of Ukraine , reached points, and all of top 9 scored or more points, and 25 of the 26 positions got their highest points ever.

This feat was extended in when Salvador Sobral beat Ukraine's points record by points, getting points in total, in addition to Bulgaria beating the same score by 81 points with a total amount of points.

Had Portugal won under the previous voting system it would still have had the highest total ever with points, becoming the first competitor to score or more points, theoretically setting a new record of 20 maximum scores beating Norway and Sweden.

In , Ukraine did not win either the jury vote or the televote, but won the contest with the highest combined vote. The televote was won by Russia and the jury vote by Australia.

In , eventual winner Israel won the televote but came in third with the jury vote won by Austria. In , Netherlands placed third with the juries North Macedonia first, Sweden second and second with the televote Norway first.

The Netherlands had the highest combined vote and thus they won the contest. Since the winner has been awarded an official winner's trophy of the Eurovision Song Contest that is presented by the previous year's winning artist.

The trophy is a handmade piece of sandblasted glass in the shape of a s microphone. There have been a number of Eurovision artists and groups whose careers were directly launched into the spotlight following their win.

As of the contest, he remains the only artist to have won more than once as a performer. Several other winners were well-known artists who won the contest mid-career after they had already established themselves, including Katrina and the Waves , winners in with " Love Shine a Light ", [] Lulu , winner in with " Boom Bang-a-Bang ", and Sandie Shaw , winner in with " Puppet on a String ".

Women have dominated the contest since its inception, with 38 solo female wins, notably including the first two winners, all four winners in the infamous contest, and the two entries that initially tied for the win in before Sweden, represented by Carola, won the tie-breaker and claimed sole victory.

A further 11 victories feature women as members of duos or groups, though these are mostly mixed-gender, including ABBA's win in and Brotherhood of Man in , meaning women have been present on 49 of the 67 total winning entries as of [update].

The most recent winner of the contest is Duncan Laurence who won the contest for The Netherlands. Since , the tradition of interval acts between the songs in the competition programme and the announcement of the voting has been established.

Interval and opening entertainment has included such acts as pop superstars Madonna , Justin Timberlake , Aqua and t. Other interval acts include recorded footage of the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo , circus clown Charlie Rivel , quick-change artist Arturo Brachetti and mentalist Lior Suchard The event in Jerusalem finished with the three presenters Yigal Ravid , Sigal Shachmon , and Dafna Dekel inviting everyone on stage to sing a rendition of the English version of " Hallelujah ", the Israeli winner from the Contest , as a tribute to the victims of the Balkan War particularly FR Yugoslavia , which was banned from participation as penalty for the Balkan Wars.

In recognition of Australia's love affair with the annual event, the interval act for the second semi-final in was a presentation by Australia featuring Jessica Mauboy who performed " Sea of Flags ".

Her appearance marked the first time Australia had been represented at Eurovision and was first solo artist from a non-participating country to perform as a guest.

In the first semi-final of in Stockholm , part of the interval acts was a dance performance devoted to the European migrant crisis.

Special guests of Eurovision Song Contest have been also well-known athletes, such as boxers Vitali and Wladimir Klitschko , [] tennis player Novak Djokovic first semi-final [] and retired basketball player Vlade Divac Grand Final , [] who opened the televoting.

Since , the tradition of opening the Grand Final with the "Parade of Nations" or the "Flag Parade" has been established, similar to the Olympic Games opening ceremony.

In , a concert television programme was held to commemorate the contest's twenty-fifth anniversary. The event, entitled Songs of Europe , took place in Mysen , Norway, featuring nearly all the winners of the contest, from to It was hosted by Rolf Kirkvaag and Titten Tei.

The show, entitled Congratulations: 50 Years of the Eurovision Song Contest after Cliff Richard 's entry for the United Kingdom, was held in Copenhagen, and featured a competition among fourteen of the most popular songs from the last 50 years of the contest.

A telephone vote was held to determine the most popular Eurovision song of all-time, which was won by the ABBA song " Waterloo " winner for Sweden in In , the EBU had decided again to commemorate the contest and agreed with the United Kingdom's broadcaster, BBC, to produce a show for the 60th anniversary of the contest, after evaluating several proposals from member broadcasters in regards to the anniversary celebration beyond the Contest in May.

The event was hosted by the British commentator for Eurovision, Graham Norton , and the host of the and Contest , Petra Mede.

The contest has been the subject of criticism regarding both its musical and political content. Most recently in and , Russia was heavily booed when it qualified for the final and received high points.

China 's broadcaster Mango TV , which broadcast Contest for Chinese audiences, was banned from broadcasting Eurovision after it was revealed that Mango TV censored Ireland's same sex dance performance, [] along with censoring LGBT symbols and tattoos.

Because the songs play to such a diverse international audience with contrasting musical tastes, and countries want to be able to appeal to as many people as possible to gain votes, this has led to the music of the contest being characterised as a "mishmash of power ballads , ethnic rhythms and bubblegum pop ".

The contest has long been accused by some of political bias; the perception is that judges and televoters allocate points based on their nation's relationship to the other countries, rather than the musical merits of the songs.

A recent study in the Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation [] presents a new approach which allows an analysis of the whole time-line of the contest from to to investigate collusion and the cluster blocks which have been changing.

It allows the analysis to find collusive associations over time periods where the voting scheme is non-homogeneous.

The results show a changing pattern in the collusive tendencies previously discussed. The current research into the analysis of the voting patterns has been used in notable sources, such as the Economist, for investigating whether over year periods such collusion is increasing or decreasing.

As an example, Terry Wogan , the United Kingdom's presenter of Eurovision since and one of the only three presenters mentioned by name during the contest proper [] stood down from BBC One 's broadcast in saying "The voting used to be about the songs.

Now it's about national prejudices. We [the United Kingdom] are on our own. We had a very good song, a very good singer, we came joint last.

I don't want to be presiding over another debacle. Another influential factor is the high proportion of expatriates and ethnic minorities living in certain countries.

Although judges and televoters cannot vote for their own country's entry, expatriates can vote for their country of origin.

The total numbers of points to be distributed by each country are equal, irrespective of the country's population.

Thus voters in countries with larger populations have less power as individuals to influence the result of the contest than those voting in smaller countries.

For example, San Marino holds the same voting power as Russia despite the vast geographic and population differences between them. Although many of them used to give their 12 points to the same country each year, like Turkey and Azerbaijan, it has been noticed that factors such as the sets of other high votes received 7, 8 or 10 points and the number of countries giving points to a specific entry, also highly affect the final positions.

An overview of the overall preference between countries that exhibits patterns of high score allocations is a question that appears frequently and recently a new study investigates the question of 'neglect' in the competition.

The concept of 'neglect' here is represented by countries which produce patterns of biased low score allocations to certain countries.

Together these two patterns provide a better view of the competition's intrinsic country pair biases. Result of such a study are presented in this paper.

From onwards, the final and the semi-finals running order of the competing performances at the semi-finals and the final has been decided by the show's producers and then approved by the EBU Executive Supervisor and the Reference Group.

An "allocation draw" occurs for the final and the semi-finals with each nation drawing to perform in the first or second half.

Position 17 has the most victories, with 7.

Das soll keine Anordnung der Flaggen untereinander schwarz-rot-gold sein, sondern sie werden im Video chronologisch nach Beitritt in die einzelnen Farben zerlegt. Mir gefällt vor allem die Idee der Darstellung der zeitlichen Reihenfolge der Teilnahme super. Ähnliche Beiträge. Sehr verwirrend! Durch nachträgliche Read more der Originaldatei können einige Details verändert worden sein. Verwirrend bleibt es trotzdem, da es Beste Spielothek Ebrach finden bei manchen Flaggen trotzdem passt. Ob das jetzt für bare münze zu nehmen ist, weiss ich nicht. Fakten, Daten und nicht originelle Information in herkömmlichem Schriftsatz oder einfacher Handschrift und einfache geometrische Formen sind nicht durch das Urheberrecht geschützt. Diese Website verwendet Akismet, um Spam zu reduzieren. Die niederländischen Veranstalter click here es hier, die vielen Ansprüche, die an ein solches Logo gestellt Iphone Apps Auf Pc Spielen, unter einen Hut zu bringen. Also ist der Ausstieg Ungarns doch politisch motiviert. Manchmal denke ich, wir sind hier nicht mehr see more weit von solchem Gedankengut fern. Klicke auf einen Zeitpunkt, um diese Version zu laden. Passen würde es zur momentanen lage in ungarn. Da hätte ich mir eine andere Farbe gewünscht. LOGO kann nicht ra– d1eren (zumindest im Moment noch nicht, aber wir Und so wird es dann gemacht: Sie drücken die Taste ESC (sie ist links oben bei den. Das Logo für den Eurovision Song Contest in Rotterdam ist da und es zelebriert gleichzeitig das jährige Jubiläum des ESC sowie das. sie die Kartons und die Sporttasche mit einem ESC-Logo darunter hervorzog. McMissile sprang neugierig wieder vom Bett und beschnupperte die Erbstücke. Der ESC hat nun auch ein grafisches "Gesicht". Das Logo zum Motto "Open Up" ist am Donnerstag veröffentlicht worden. Logo des ESC.

In , Netherlands placed third with the juries North Macedonia first, Sweden second and second with the televote Norway first.

The Netherlands had the highest combined vote and thus they won the contest. Since the winner has been awarded an official winner's trophy of the Eurovision Song Contest that is presented by the previous year's winning artist.

The trophy is a handmade piece of sandblasted glass in the shape of a s microphone. There have been a number of Eurovision artists and groups whose careers were directly launched into the spotlight following their win.

As of the contest, he remains the only artist to have won more than once as a performer. Several other winners were well-known artists who won the contest mid-career after they had already established themselves, including Katrina and the Waves , winners in with " Love Shine a Light ", [] Lulu , winner in with " Boom Bang-a-Bang ", and Sandie Shaw , winner in with " Puppet on a String ".

Women have dominated the contest since its inception, with 38 solo female wins, notably including the first two winners, all four winners in the infamous contest, and the two entries that initially tied for the win in before Sweden, represented by Carola, won the tie-breaker and claimed sole victory.

A further 11 victories feature women as members of duos or groups, though these are mostly mixed-gender, including ABBA's win in and Brotherhood of Man in , meaning women have been present on 49 of the 67 total winning entries as of [update].

The most recent winner of the contest is Duncan Laurence who won the contest for The Netherlands. Since , the tradition of interval acts between the songs in the competition programme and the announcement of the voting has been established.

Interval and opening entertainment has included such acts as pop superstars Madonna , Justin Timberlake , Aqua and t.

Other interval acts include recorded footage of the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo , circus clown Charlie Rivel , quick-change artist Arturo Brachetti and mentalist Lior Suchard The event in Jerusalem finished with the three presenters Yigal Ravid , Sigal Shachmon , and Dafna Dekel inviting everyone on stage to sing a rendition of the English version of " Hallelujah ", the Israeli winner from the Contest , as a tribute to the victims of the Balkan War particularly FR Yugoslavia , which was banned from participation as penalty for the Balkan Wars.

In recognition of Australia's love affair with the annual event, the interval act for the second semi-final in was a presentation by Australia featuring Jessica Mauboy who performed " Sea of Flags ".

Her appearance marked the first time Australia had been represented at Eurovision and was first solo artist from a non-participating country to perform as a guest.

In the first semi-final of in Stockholm , part of the interval acts was a dance performance devoted to the European migrant crisis.

Special guests of Eurovision Song Contest have been also well-known athletes, such as boxers Vitali and Wladimir Klitschko , [] tennis player Novak Djokovic first semi-final [] and retired basketball player Vlade Divac Grand Final , [] who opened the televoting.

Since , the tradition of opening the Grand Final with the "Parade of Nations" or the "Flag Parade" has been established, similar to the Olympic Games opening ceremony.

In , a concert television programme was held to commemorate the contest's twenty-fifth anniversary. The event, entitled Songs of Europe , took place in Mysen , Norway, featuring nearly all the winners of the contest, from to It was hosted by Rolf Kirkvaag and Titten Tei.

The show, entitled Congratulations: 50 Years of the Eurovision Song Contest after Cliff Richard 's entry for the United Kingdom, was held in Copenhagen, and featured a competition among fourteen of the most popular songs from the last 50 years of the contest.

A telephone vote was held to determine the most popular Eurovision song of all-time, which was won by the ABBA song " Waterloo " winner for Sweden in In , the EBU had decided again to commemorate the contest and agreed with the United Kingdom's broadcaster, BBC, to produce a show for the 60th anniversary of the contest, after evaluating several proposals from member broadcasters in regards to the anniversary celebration beyond the Contest in May.

The event was hosted by the British commentator for Eurovision, Graham Norton , and the host of the and Contest , Petra Mede. The contest has been the subject of criticism regarding both its musical and political content.

Most recently in and , Russia was heavily booed when it qualified for the final and received high points. China 's broadcaster Mango TV , which broadcast Contest for Chinese audiences, was banned from broadcasting Eurovision after it was revealed that Mango TV censored Ireland's same sex dance performance, [] along with censoring LGBT symbols and tattoos.

Because the songs play to such a diverse international audience with contrasting musical tastes, and countries want to be able to appeal to as many people as possible to gain votes, this has led to the music of the contest being characterised as a "mishmash of power ballads , ethnic rhythms and bubblegum pop ".

The contest has long been accused by some of political bias; the perception is that judges and televoters allocate points based on their nation's relationship to the other countries, rather than the musical merits of the songs.

A recent study in the Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation [] presents a new approach which allows an analysis of the whole time-line of the contest from to to investigate collusion and the cluster blocks which have been changing.

It allows the analysis to find collusive associations over time periods where the voting scheme is non-homogeneous.

The results show a changing pattern in the collusive tendencies previously discussed. The current research into the analysis of the voting patterns has been used in notable sources, such as the Economist, for investigating whether over year periods such collusion is increasing or decreasing.

As an example, Terry Wogan , the United Kingdom's presenter of Eurovision since and one of the only three presenters mentioned by name during the contest proper [] stood down from BBC One 's broadcast in saying "The voting used to be about the songs.

Now it's about national prejudices. We [the United Kingdom] are on our own. We had a very good song, a very good singer, we came joint last.

I don't want to be presiding over another debacle. Another influential factor is the high proportion of expatriates and ethnic minorities living in certain countries.

Although judges and televoters cannot vote for their own country's entry, expatriates can vote for their country of origin. The total numbers of points to be distributed by each country are equal, irrespective of the country's population.

Thus voters in countries with larger populations have less power as individuals to influence the result of the contest than those voting in smaller countries.

For example, San Marino holds the same voting power as Russia despite the vast geographic and population differences between them.

Although many of them used to give their 12 points to the same country each year, like Turkey and Azerbaijan, it has been noticed that factors such as the sets of other high votes received 7, 8 or 10 points and the number of countries giving points to a specific entry, also highly affect the final positions.

An overview of the overall preference between countries that exhibits patterns of high score allocations is a question that appears frequently and recently a new study investigates the question of 'neglect' in the competition.

The concept of 'neglect' here is represented by countries which produce patterns of biased low score allocations to certain countries.

Together these two patterns provide a better view of the competition's intrinsic country pair biases. Result of such a study are presented in this paper.

From onwards, the final and the semi-finals running order of the competing performances at the semi-finals and the final has been decided by the show's producers and then approved by the EBU Executive Supervisor and the Reference Group.

An "allocation draw" occurs for the final and the semi-finals with each nation drawing to perform in the first or second half.

Position 17 has the most victories, with 7. Positions 25, 26 and 27 have not won either, but there have been very few finals with that many participants.

A number of spin-offs and imitators of the Eurovision Song Contest have been produced over the years, some national and others international.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For the most recent contest, see Eurovision Song Contest For the upcoming contest, see Eurovision Song Contest For other uses of "Eurovision", see Eurovision disambiguation.

Annual song competition held among the member countries of the European Broadcasting Union. Eurovision ESC. Further information: History of the Eurovision Song Contest.

Further information: List of countries in the Eurovision Song Contest. Entered at least once. Never entered, although eligible to do so.

Entry intended, but later withdrew. Competed as a part of another country, but never as a sovereign country. See also: List of host cities of the Eurovision Song Contest.

Further information: Rules of the Eurovision Song Contest. Main article: Languages in the Eurovision Song Contest. Further information: Voting at the Eurovision Song Contest.

Further information: List of Eurovision Song Contest winners. Main article: Songs of Europe concert. Produced using the methods presented in [] and [] a network of the significant score deviations can be viewed over a time period of interest.

When the Eurovision Song Contest was in Zagreb, it was in the former country of Yugoslavia which cannot be shown on the map.

European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original PDF on 28 May Retrieved 26 December Guinness World Records.

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Daily Mail and General Trust. In the mids, the members of the European Broadcasting Union set up an ad hoc committee to investigate ways of rallying the countries of Europe round a light entertainment programme.

It was on 6 June , that Montreux became the venue for the first transmission by the EBU's Eurovision Network of the Narcissus Festival and its flower-bedecked procession floats.

The idea was approved by the EBU General Assembly in Rome on 19 October , and it was decided that the first "Eurovision Grand Prix" — so baptised, incidentally, by a British journalist — would take place in spring at Lugano, Switzerland.

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O'Connor, John Kennedy. Raykoff, Ivan and Robert D. Tobin eds. Save your creative energy for other projects.

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